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Giant Antarctic Iceberg Larger Than New York Finally Breaks Free


Giant Antarctic Iceberg Larger Than New York Finally Breaks Free

Gigantic iceberg A23a, surpassing the areas of London and New York and even the Australian Capital Territory, has finally broken free from Antarctica. The ice mass, which calved from the Filchner Ice Shelf in 1986, is now drifting northward into the Southern Ocean, heading towards South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. Covering an area of approximately 3,900km² and extending about 400m deep, A23a’s movement is the result of nearly four decades since it initially broke away from its parent ice shelf, and it’s not considered directly linked to climate change. Scientists, utilizing sophisticated satellite imaging and radar data, track its trajectory, observing similar patterns to other large icebergs in the region, like A68a and A76a. As the iceberg enters warmer waters, it is expected to disintegrate, a process that demands monitoring due to potential hazards for ships and coastal access. On the positive side, the melting iceberg releases snap-frozen nutrients into the Southern Ocean, benefiting marine ecosystems and supporting various organisms.

 Giant Antarctic Iceberg Larger Than New York Finally Breaks Free


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